How We Learn

How We Learn

When it comes to our education, we trust what works. Our curriculum is based on a 1500-year-old liberal arts tradition of the Trivium, which has produced some of the greatest thinkers and leaders throughout history. The Trivium consists of grammar, logic, and rhetoric, tools which prepare students to reason and communicate with eloquence.

The classical model of education is grounded in the concept that exceptional teachers help students harness their natural characteristics of curiosity and wonder, directing them to a deeper and fuller understanding of the world. Teachers use an historic form of questioning, Socratic dialogue, to help students see what they know, what they think they know, and what they want to know.

Teachers engage not only students’ minds, but hearts as well. Our method of instruction exists within relationship, where students are known and loved by their teachers, where their worth is not weighed by their grade point average, where their unique gifts and talents are celebrated.

This teacher-student relationship mimics that of Jesus and his disciples, for he too taught with questions and stories, revealing to them what they thought they knew and what they so desperately needed to know. And so Westminster teachers, in a small way, strive to love students as Jesus loved his disciples.